Needed: Automated Database Integration

 It’s long been a truism that data is one of the key assets, if not the key asset, for an enterprise. Our recent conversations with customers are putting a new spin on this insight. They are telling us why database integration and automation are increasingly important to them to not only reduce costs, but to increase agility. Integration Requirements By integration we mean the ability to quickly and easily combine data from multiple source relational databases into one, or more, central databases while keeping the original databases intact. Such integration allows customers and suppliers to share production and parts information without the expense of implementing EDI. Field auditors at a federal agency are using our own DataPortal to easily share relational databases of audit records to give managers a cross-geography view of agency performance. An online retailer could use such integration to combine information from multiple suppliers and distributors into a single database so web customers can get an up-to-date view of stock on hand and ship dates. Much of this information is stored in relational databases. Our customers are telling us they need to integrate these databases without stripping out the table structures and table references that allow ad-hoc queries. They also need to retain the complex data types (anything from engineering change orders to marketing images) they store in relational platforms. Customers also need to be able to identify which database fields originated in which source database. Such tracking by the source of information is important for anything from identifying which supplier has the lowest prices or most inventory to identifying the source of cost or sales issues within multiple business units. Customers also tell us they need to perform this integration easily and quickly. Ideally, they’d like to see it automated. This not only reduces data management costs, but helps an organization respond with greater agility to changing business needs. For example, the more quickly a major aerospace manufacturer can see database information from new suppliers, the more quickly it can fill its needs for critical parts. The more quickly a CFO can see integrated cost and sales databases from various business units, the more quickly he can see and fix problems.  Our Solution Traditionally, database integration has required days, weeks or months of work by skilled database administrators using database management tools. These days, that is unfeasible both from a cost and a time perspective....

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Data Sharing… Also Known as Data Transfer, Data Migration, Data Replication, etc.

Data Sharing… Also Known as Data Transfer, Data Migration, Data Replication, etc.

Like everyone else in the tech industry, we in the database field can get a little sloppy when describing the various actions we take with our data stores. We use words like “migrate,” “copy,” “move” and “share” to mean many of the same things…except when we don’t. We at DataPortal run into this problem when we describe our solution as providing “database sharing.” Audiences sometimes look at us as if we were suggesting they share, oh, their ATM passcodes or their car keys. Being specific is important because, as our chart below shows, using the wrong term could lead you to spend more time, effort, and money than you need to. Here’s what, in our view, the various forms of “sharing” do and don’t mean, and where Data Portal does and doesn’t fit the bill. Remember, as you compare this chart to others you may have seen, when we say we can “share” databases we mean even the largest relational databases, in their full relational form, without adapting the databases, using custom protocols or reworking security architectures. Buzzword What It Means Can DataPortal™ Do It? Transfer Change the physical location of a database so only one copy of exists in a single place. Yes Copy Make an exact replica of a database so a copy or copies of it exist in multiple locations. Yes Migrate Copies a database from one database server platform (e.g. vendor, version) to another Yes Edit Allow one or more users or applications parties to view and make changes to the database. Yes Update Allow one or more users or applications to replace existing data with newer data. Yes Append Add additional columns and/or rows to an existing database. Yes Move Change the location Yes Replicate Make changes in multiple copies of a database to reconcile changes among them. Yes* Share Allow multiple users and/or applications to receive their own local copy of a database on their preferred database server platform. Yes *Even better, database updating can be automated so that all child databases are updated whenever the parent source database changes. You see we snuck “share” back into our list at the end, but for a good reason.  To us, database sharing simply means giving users appropriate access to view and change information that is stored in the form of a relational database, which is one of the most direct and efficient ways that...

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A Visual Explanation of DataPortal™ vs. EDI – Our Data Sharing Infographic

A Visual Explanation of DataPortal™ vs. EDI – Our Data Sharing Infographic

In the past, sharing complex data over the web in a quick and efficient manner was a daunting, and often times, overwhelming  process. Until now! We’ve developed an easy to use, web based software application that takes the stress, aggravation and expense out of sharing complex data over the web. Meet DataPortal™. To help demonstrate the simplicity of DataPortal™ and why it is the best solution for your data sharing needs, we’ve put together this amazing data sharing infographic that will walk you through the ins and outs of DataPortal™. We cover the basics from what sets DataPortal™ apart from other data sharing tools like EDI to how DataPortal™ works and who has has success with it. Scroll down to learn more » Embed This Image On Your Site (copy code below): Courtesy of:...

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